CUTE BIRD, BUT WHAT IS TURNSTONE?

"Gooooooooooooo Turnstone!" or “Go. Turn. Stone.”
Often the answer is right in front of you and is simple to realize.

Go Turnstone. Go look at common everyday events, issues, problems or ideas (the stones) in your work and simply turn that stone over. What different way can you approach your events, issues, problems or ideas and improve them? How can you innovatatively tweak just one or two little pieces, maybe in the way your organization facilitates a training or a meeting or policy and procedures to improve it?

The answer often time is right in front of you and is quite simple to realize.
All you have to do is . . . Turnstone.
The Ruddy Turnstone is a very cool bird. It is a migratory shorebird that visits the town that I live in on the eastern shores of Massachusetts. It usually can be seen during two times a year, migrating to and from its Arctic breeding grounds. Usually May and June on the way north and August and September on the way south.

So what the heck does this have to do with you and your work? EVERYTHING!

You see, the Turnstone does one little simple move that most other shorebirds either haven’t developed the skill to do or just didn’t learn it. The vast majority of shorebirds, when feeding, can be seen simply probing the beach or shoreline for food. The Turnstone however, takes its bill and uses it as a tool to turn stones over, thus getting its name.

It’s that one little twist, that one little “different way” to approach the method of feeding and it is able to find food that the other birds will definitely miss or won’t have access to. Such a simple little twist, that for this bird, has become a “game changer."

I think so highly of this little creative animal that I have chosen to name my business after it . . . Turnstone. You can pronounce the title a couple of ways . . . You can read that in an emphatic cheerleading voice like “Gooooooooooooo Turnstone!” or you read it pretty slowly and reemphasize some syllables and read it as “Go. Turn. Stone.” Either way, I hope you get the same meaing from it that I do.

Go turnstone. Go look at common everyday events, issues, problems or ideas (the stones) in your work and simply turn that stone over. What different way can you approach your events, issues, problems or ideas and improve them? How can you innovatatively tweak just one or two little pieces, maybe in the way your organization facilitates a training or a meeting or policy and procedures to improve it? The answer often time is right in front of you and is quite simple to realize.

All you have to do is . . . Turnstone.